Is Anxiety An Emotion?

Many people wonder if anxiety is an emotion? If you have read my previous post, “What is the Purpose of Emotions?” you would know that I presented the idea that the purpose of emotions is “to alert us to the fact that something is “off” in our emotional world.” Using this understanding of the purpose for emotions, will allow us to provide an answer to the question “Is anxiety an emotion?”

Does Anxiety qualify as an emotion?

In consulting the Merriam-Webster Dictionary, the first definition found for anxiety is “apprehensive uneasiness or nervousness usually over an impending or anticipated ill: a state of being anxious.” Some synonyms given for anxiety by Merriam-Webster are care, concern, anxiety, and worry.

Using our stated definition for an emotion, anxiety would qualify as being an emotion; because the purpose of anxiety is to alert us to the fact that something is “off” in our emotional world. While anxiety is an emotion, like many other emotions, it can be both bad (Toxic) and good (Healthy).

Why Healthy anxiety is a good thing

Healthy anxiety motivates you to take some type of action, to act in some way that will either diminish or end the anxious feeling.

Let me give you an example of Healthy anxiety: Let’s say you have a marketing presentation coming up next week that is pivotal to you landing a major account for your company. It would be totally appropriate and expected that you would be feeling some anxiety about this.

This anxiety is designed to alert you to the importance of this presentation and most likely the level of anxiety would go up in relation to how important this presentation is for you.

So, you’re feeling anxious. Now what? Most likely the answer would be to take the time to work on your presentation, to do whatever preparation is needed to make it the best presentation you can offer. Once you have done that and you feel confident in your preparation for the presentation, what do you think would happen to your anxiety? At a minimum it would decrease significantly and might even have resolved itself.

Now you give your presentation and you ace it! Was the anxiety you experienced worth it? Without the anxiety you might have felt complacent, not taken any time to prep, and then bombed a major presentation. However, because of your anxiety, you acknowledged what the feeling was trying to tell you and took specific, decisive action which resulted in success. Yes, the anxiety was worth it! This is how Healthy anxiety works for our benefit.

Why Toxic anxiety is not good for you.          

Now let’s take a look at Toxic anxiety. Again, I’ll use an example for consideration.

You have just come from your doctor’s appointment and he/she has found a suspicious lump that he/she wants you to have biopsied. The biopsy is set for the next day, so you go home and spend the rest of the day and night worrying about what the biopsy might show.

Now you have the biopsy done and your worry continues, with the addition of all the what-ifs going through your mind. What if it’s cancer, what …. And on and on in a negative downward spiral.

A few days later you get the results, the biopsy was negative and there is no problem. You feel an intense sense of relief. This is a very normal scenario for most of us, but here is the question for you – did all the anxiety and worry you experience serve any good purpose? No matter how much you worried and played the “what if” game, did it lead you to being able to take any action about the situation? The answer obviously is “no.” You had absolutely no way whatsoever to control or change the outcome of the biopsy.

This is why Toxic anxiety is so bad for us. This type of anxiety takes both a physical (yes, I said physical) and emotional toll on us and serves no purpose! Remember that the test was negative, so all that energy was wasted! Energy that could have been spent in a lot of better ways.

But, you say, what if the result had been positive? It doesn’t change what I’ve said, you had NO CONTROL over the outcome good or bad! The goal would be to wait until you had a definitive answer. If it was negative, you didn’t waste all that physical and emotional energy for no reason and if it was positive, the time to worry is when there is actually something to be worried about because then you can take some action to address some aspects of the worry, which is Healthy.

How do you handle Toxic anxiety?

The truthful answer is, the best you can. Everyone at some point is going to experience Toxic anxiety, and nothing you are going to do will prevent it; but you can learn to be aware of it, understand that it serves no useful purpose, and do your best to give it as little influence/space as possible.

This is where, as a Pastoral Counselor, I would say the ideal is to have faith in some type of positive, good, and caring, higher power. One who you can lean on for support when you struggle with toxic anxiety. The second-best option is to have a positive support system that you can turn to for emotional support.

An additional option is to learn skills for managing Toxic anxiety when it does occur and that will be the topic of another post.

Conclusion

Is anxiety and emotion? As has been demonstrated in this post, the answer is most definitely a YES. It is an emotion that, like all emotions, serves the purpose of alerting us to problems in our lives and it has both its positive and negative sides.

So, when you’re experiencing Healthy anxiety, embrace it for the gift it is and use it to better manage your life. However, when you’re experiencing Toxic anxiety, acknowledge it for what it is and try to give it as little space in your life as you can.

In my next post I will address ways to manage Toxic anxiety. Please join me. Subscribe to our newsletter, below, and get notified when new articles are published.


I would also welcome your feedback on this post, as well as suggestions for future topics of interest to you.

Blessing

Debra

14 comments

  1. john says:

    Hi Debra,
    you have a valid point about negative anxiety. We like to play the what-if game a lot and we only get worse instead of better. It is very unproductive and having faith in God and a support system will definitely help.

    1. admin says:

      Thank you for your feedback John. It was greatly appreciated as this is only the second post I’ve done, and trying to convert what I know and share professionally into a post like this is something new for me.

  2. Tyler Hansen says:

    Hello. Thank you for this article. The sections about ‘healthy’ and ‘toxic’ anxiety had a great impact on me.

    Cheers!

  3. For me, something like this is just a shower thought and nothing more. I never really thought of looking into stuff like this. This is a really interesting article, covering a question that not many people thought of asking.

    Anyway, there are some good points throughout this article. Especially when you define how anxieties differ.

    Thank you for this very interesting article and keep up the great work!
    -Joseph

  4. Catherine says:

    Hi Debra,

    I was very pleased to see the topic you wrote about. As a mental health professional myself I do find it so important that people know more about anxiety and how this doesn’t have to be always ‘a problem’.
    Feeling anxious is in fact very normal, a feeling we all experience as human beings. It helps us survive.
    Thank you for informing people about the distinction between healthy vs. toxic anxiety!

    Catherine.

  5. Jason says:

    Brilliant article to read, found it interesting to the point of commenting on how great a read I actually found it, well done and keep up the good work.
    This I have book marked for reference to it in the future!
    Thanks Jason

  6. Koa_Florian says:

    I found the topic useful and am looking forward to the next one on ways to manage toxic anxiety.

  7. Nora Handy says:

    A good read Nice to know the difference between the 2 anxieties. Applications for handling should be easier.

  8. Ginger says:

    This article is a very good reminder of what anxiety can do to you. Thank you.

  9. April Welborn says:

    The experience of being a student in college, I understand completely the “good anxiety”. Also; suffering from anxiety, I understand the “toxic anxiety”. Now I understand them even better. Thank you for your explanation of the two.

    1. admin says:

      You’re welcome. I’m glad it helped you to understand anxiety better.

  10. Sarah says:

    Great examples to illustrate your points.

    1. admin says:

      Thanks for the feedback it’s greatly appreciated.

  11. Mandy says:

    I wasn’t aware of 2 different kinds of anxiety. Healthy and Toxic, I typically only notice the toxic.
    *When you’re experiencing Healthy anxiety, embrace it!
    *When you’re experiencing toxic anxiety, don’t let it waste space in your thinking and take it one thing at a time, and remember it’s not worth the energy.

    Before this video, I have tried to control everything in my life.
    You can only handle Toxic anxiety the best you can. Try not to let yourself worry over things you can’t control. You’re wasting energy in a negative manner by worrying, waiting for the actual answer to either a test or a situation and just take it one thing at a time.

    *No matter what the situation is, you cannot control the outcome.*

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